Author: Kim Goodhart


Posted on / by Kim Goodhart / in Uncategorized, Up-close-and-personal with NZ's leading

Mike Bennetts, CEO Z Energy – Up-close-and-personal with NZ’s leading visionary CEOs

While asking other CEOs who they most admire and would like to hear more about or learn from they often mention Mike Bennetts, CEO Z.

It’s not often you get the privilege to hear from someone who is confident enough to be completely vulnerable. We’ve made a few videos for Z over the years and Mike is humble, differential, he giggles and listens to his people and it’s clear his approach works because his people love him and he’s achieving amazing results. People are looking for leaders that are authentic, that live by their values and take the time to encourage others to be their best selves.  If you’re wondering about the power of listening to your people then please watch this amazingly candid and interesting interview with Mike. It was a true pleasure to learn more about who he is as man and I hope you get as much from this interview as I did.

Posted on / by Kim Goodhart / in visionary CEOs

Nick Astwick, CEO Southern Cross Health Society – Up-close-and-personal with NZ’s leading visionary CEOs

The world is changing and visionary CEOs are forging a new paradigm. They’re discovering that you CAN boost profits and make the world and your people better off. You CAN be fulfilled, grow, and be a decent human being. You CAN be decisive and vulnerable. How are they doing it? You can learn from the best. We have. Welcome to the first of our one-on-one up close and personal looks at NZ’s leading visionary CEOs. Nick Astwick!

Posted on / by Kim Goodhart / in Kim, Strategy - Vision

How storytelling helps you build business momentum

Success is over-rated. Think about it. After every big event, once the crowds and athletes have departed, what remains? Empty streets, litter, the sound of the wind and the creak of the abandoned winner’s podium.

Ask any Olympic gold medallist about that ‘lost’ feeling they get when the shouting’s all over. Think about the sense of regret you may feel when a good story ends. Hitting your sales budgets does not make you a great business. A happy ending does not in itself make a story good.

Staff need to constantly strive for wins

These outcomes are alright for stories and the Olympic Games. For all one-off-events that must come to an end. But your business is not a one-off event. One win must follow another, on and on, forever. So how do you keep it going? How do you keep your staff striving for win after win without getting bored? What do you do about that sense of déjà vu which, whether it follows a win or a loss, can incite feelings of futility?

In our previous two blogs “What Hollywood can teach business about culture, purpose and success” and “How do banks, retailers and insurance companies use storytelling to build success?” we discussed how purposeful storytelling could help you achieve successful transformation or cultural change within your organisation (for more on storytelling to build business momentum download our free eGuide here). But once you’ve achieved your initial objectives, how do you keep momentum?

The Dramatic Question

In the blog “How do banks, retailers and insurance companies use storytelling to build success?” we used Dunkirk and the rescue of more than 300 000 soldiers as an analogy to explain the concept of the ‘inciting incident’ (the battle of Dunkirk) and the ‘dramatic question’ (who will rescue the soldiers?) as two devices that are useful for achieving business objectives, in the same way as they achieve story goals.

If the heroes of the story were able to answer the dramatic question quickly, then that would be it. The soldiers make it home safely. The end. And yet, this is exactly the dilemma that confronts companies all the time, at that moment they meet their targets.

But unlike a story, there is no ending for your business. There’s only onward and upward, or a slow drift in the opposite direction.

The answer? To keep your customers, your staff and other stakeholders engaged and motivated, you need to uncover more dramatic questions.

Inciting Incidents

Fortunately, there’s also no end to inciting incidents when you’re in business – for example, head office whims, digital disruption, economic downturns, new inventions, changing social attitudes, fickle politicians.

For every inciting incident, there is a dramatic question. Sometimes the inciting incident is in your face, other times it’s sneakier, more subtle or a vague sense of disquiet.

Some of these dramatic questions may be:

  • ‘How do we work within the restrictions set by head office?’
  • ‘What will we do about emerging technologies?’
  • ‘How do we deal with the fact that we make junk food when what we really want is to teach people to have healthier eating habits?’
  • ‘How do we respond to our competitor’s new invention?’

It’s these challenges, that keeps the story interesting and the business striving.

Employees need to be a part of the Story

Importantly, if you want to keep your employees engaged you need to include them in your story. They need to be an active part of it. They need to be the hero, the audience, the stakeholders in your story. Once your staff suddenly find themselves abandoned on the beaches and no rescue in sight, they get motivated pretty quickly.

Tip: #1. List your inciting incidents and develop an understanding of the dramatic question in your business.

Tip: #2 Listen to your staff. Go to them for solutions. Let your staff try things, make mistakes and get back up and try again.

Tip #3: Let your customers into what you are trying to achieve, and then they will cheer for you, cry for you and support you – but they need to be part of the story; actively enrolled.

Do that, and you’ll keep your employees and your customers totally ‘hooked’ on the story you’re telling.

If you want to know more about storytelling, I highly recommend these two books (the bibles of storytellers):

‘Story’ by Robert McKee; and

‘Screenplay’ by Syd Field.

To read more on how purposeful storytelling can help you achieve successful transformation or cultural change within your organisation, download the eGuide Why 70% of Organisational Transformations Fail and How to Fix the Problem” here.

 

Posted on / by Kim Goodhart / in Kim, Purpose

How living my purpose landed me in deep water

“The trouble with not having a goal is that you can spend your life running up and down the field and never score.” –Bill Copeland

 How my purpose landed me in deep water

About a year ago I was asked if I would facilitate a conference for 60 people over two days. I had never spoken on a stage as an adult, and I had never run a conference, but… the topic of the conference played to every element of my purpose, using ‘real stories to inspire people’ to grow, to have fun, to enjoy life and work. To turn away from it would have been to turn away from my purpose…something I could NEVER have done.

Over the next two months, I planned 8 workshops, talks and activities.

I was terrified

Truth was, I was terrified, almost paralysed by the fear and there were countless times when I wondered whether I was doing the right thing. Part of me wanted to move out to a small cottage in the country and forget all about it. To some people, public speaking may not be such a frightening prospect, but I was terrified, there was a very real chance that I would be overtaken by uncontrollable shakes (it had happened to me before) and suddenly I was swimming in the deep end.

Enormous amounts of adrenalin cascaded through my body, triggering the fight or flight response. Or as my partner calls it, ‘the cowering in the corner, like a scared rabbit response’.

Adrenaline and the breath

However, I knew that it was something I just had to do, and so I ran regularly to burn off the excess adrenalin and I used breathing techniques to calm my thoughts. I use a technique where you breathe in for a count of one, out for one, then breathe in for 2, out for 2, then 3, then 4, then 5, then 6, then 7. By the time I get to about 6 or 7 I usually have a handle on my fear.

With the adrenalin at a manageable level it became my greatest ally. With it, I had the focus to act. I spent hours in a state of flow writing scripts and learning them by heart. I employed a coach to help me with my delivery and I lined up my children’s teddy bears on the couch and practiced talking to them – for days.

Once I knew I was prepared, the anxiety turned to excitement and I was ready to go. I was following my purpose and I felt truly alive.

I did it!

It was an exhilarating and exhausting blur of activity over two days and I loved every minute of it.

However, while the conference was a success and the organisers were happy with the outcome, the real reward came not from learning how to fascilitate a conference. It came from what I learnt about achieving my vision. Things I would never have learnt had I not accepted the challenge.

People thought I was crazy to take on such a challenge with such little notice, but I took it on because I have a clearly defined purpose, and to turn the conference down would have been to turn away from that – something I just wouldn’t have been able to do.

I also learnt more about what my purpose is, how it can be achieved and what the challenges are that I will face to achieve it. I’ve done two more talks since and I have learnt even more from those, getting better with each one.

I learnt a lot about people, what they want to know, what makes them uncomfortable, what holds them back, what terrifies them…

But, you may be wondering, what’s the ‘moral’ of this story?

It’s this:

If I did not have a clearly defined purpose, I would never have been given the opportunity, never mind have accepted it. I would not have faced my fear and I would not have learned to speak on a stage. A purpose is like a compass pointing to ones ‘true north’.

Everybody – individuals, businesses and organisations – should have a purpose, a ‘reason why’ because without it there can be no authentic achievement and fewer significant learnings and experiences.

Live your life, do your business, on purpose – you’ll be surprised, delighted and enriched by the journey. Purpose makes us better swimmers.

 

Click here to download: “How to inspire your employees and get them excited by your company vision”.

 

 

 

Posted on / by Kim Goodhart / in Kim

How to utilise the power of the ‘aha’ moment to motivate your teams.

The ‘aha’ moment of coming up with a solution to a challenge that you’ve been facing is one of life’s greatest pleasures.

In this talk I explain how everything up until that equisite feeling of the ‘aha’ moment is filled with confusion, questions and objections. So, if you want others to share in your excitement. To experience the same boost in energy that gives them the momentum to act on the idea then you need to take them on the same journey as you. And that means letting them into your decision making process until they reach the same conclusion. At that point they reach the same level of insight and are ready to act.

 

Posted on / by Kim Goodhart / in Kim

Leadership begins with revealing your ‘inner hero’

In this talk I discuss why it doesn’t matter if you’re out to save the planet from the next meteor strike, create a safer work environment or cultivate a better customer experience. If you believe in your vision and you have the strength to to see it through then you’re a hero. To create teams that trust in your decision making, that are motivated to turn your vision into a reality you need to reveal that hero and let them know what you’re really made of.

 

Posted on / by Kim Goodhart / in Kim

Connecting with customers begins with believing in yourself.

Companies that engage with their employees and customers experience a 240% boost in performance and those that don’t risk surviving on a price relationship alone. (Gallup).

Two thirds of our decision making process is made from the heart. (Gallup) So, to create engagement you have to connect with people from the heart and here lies the paradox. We currently teach people to connect by coaching them to think rationally but it’s not the rational part of the brain that governs connection. It’s the emotional control centres. And these require that you believe in yourself and what you’re saying. Not an easy task.

To achieve this you have to be able to step outside of yourself and objectively view your strengths as seen by others. When you feel that intangible connection you catch a glimmer of what you’re capable of. Then you start to believe in what you have to offer.

When we make videos for our clients that shine a light on those strengths and reveal the magic that lies within their people and their organisation they get to see with some degree of objectivity how they are seen and celebrated by others. This imbues them with a sense of confidence. They let go of their negative thought patterns and focus their attention on the people in front of them. This is when they actually start communicating and connecting with their colleagues or customers and create engagement.